36% of mobile car search convert within an hour, finds study

It will be one of these studies that will make the car and travel industry think. Nielsen, xAd and Telmetrics just published the third part of their “mobile path to purchase” study. The research is based on findings for the travel industry, restaurants and the car industry. The study found some significant differences in the consumer behavior from the three industry sectors. Especially for the car industry the findings seem notable…

The research discovered four types of mobile car users: car researchers, car, deal hunters, ircumstantial or emergency users, gear heads. All showed different signs of behavior, demographic and income profiles. There are some significant findings.

Half of the mobile car search was done as a longer term research. However, 49% were “looking to make a purchase within the day.” Even more, 36% of this part converted “within the hour.”

By comparing the three categories, the study found some elementary difference between apps and mobile web usage. While car searchers are heading for mobile web usage (maybe because their demand is not of daily expertise with these apps), the travel search is done predominatly via apps.

The study also clarified some differences between smartphone and tablet user behavior which was especially in the automotive category of importance for the car industry:
– Tablet owners are 3x more likely to be influenced by positive reviews than smartphone owners
– Tablet users spend more time looking at reviews and doing price research than smartphone users
– 42% of smartphone users do some research while in their cars

Most car search activities were business directions (44%), pricing comparison (43%) and phone numbers to business impact (36%).

Buyral Spoof: How to make a video go viral with a professional clicking agency

Often we do get asked how to make a video go viral. Well, ehre is the answer… This Buyral video shows brand and companies how they make their videos go around the world of social networks. I am sure you all will love it! And here is our advice: Don’t take this video done by St. John too serious and don’t trust every agency that will tell you they know how to get your brands latest promotion to go viral. Maybe they also have some professionals with a fast finger clicking they videos like we assumed some straneg agencies were clicking banners years ago.

adidas NEO: Interactive Window Shopping Experience

We have already seen some really cool window shopping experience by Neet-a-Porter at the beginning of the year. However, this version by adidas NEO is actually taking window shopping to a next level: an interactive digital window concept that connects to your smartphone. With this concept, it is possible to shop at their store after hours without an app or scanning a QR code.

This completely interactive in-window shopping experience lets consumers flick through clothing board according to your own taste and play with a model. They are even trying on every item. So, it is easier to see exactly how the clothes look (on a model). Now, you just need to imagine how you look like in the clothes.

This is how it works: By typing in the special URL you can connect your smartphone to the window and take control of a virtual shopping bag. Any product dropped into the window’s shopping bag instantly appears on your mobile ready to save, purchase or share with friends.

You can check out this window at adidas NEO Nürnberg store for a six-week pilot test.

Trust the Right People

These days it is easier than ever to position yourself as an expert in your field…even if you are not actually an expert. It is something that more and more people are doing and this can make it really difficult to figure out who the most trustworthy sources of information (and opinions) are. Nowhere is this truer than on the Internet. So how do you know which sources are worth trusting and which aren’t?
The first thing that you should do, when figuring out whether or not a source is trustworthy, is to check out their background. Do a Google search on the person and see what you can find. If all you can find are blog posts but no actual biographical information or records, you should probably move on to someone else. A trustworthy source will have done the work to build up that expertise. He or she will have verifiable degrees or practical experience backing them up. This doesn’t mean you can’t agree with a person’s opinion. It simply means that you shouldn’t use it as the reason to make a decision about important life matters.
For example, let’s look at Charles E Phillips former co-President, Oracle Corp.. When you put his name into Google a plethora of articles and records come up. This information goes beyond the boundaries of a simple Wikipedia entry (though Wikipedia can be a worthwhile source once in a while). There are articles in trusted publications about him and his background. The first page of the Google search brings up sources like The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, etc. This is what you want to see. If all you find are links to Ezine articles pieces, self published Yahoo News Network articles and a blog? You might want to treat carefully.
If you aren’t sure whether or not to trust a publication, check out its history. How long has the publication been in business? Who sits on its board? Who owns the publication? What are the backgrounds of these people? Do you trust that their opinions aren’t influencing the reporting done by the publication you want to cite?
Basically, when you want to know whether or not a source is trustworthy, you need to do a little “leg” work. You can’t assume that someone is automatically trustworthy because he has been published. Gone are the days of “well he has a book so he must know what he’s talking about.”

Thought-Provoking: The Future of Learning (Video)

We all know that our society is changing in terms of how we are learning today. But in which way does information communication technology redefine the way we learn in the Networked Society? In an interesting video Ericsson draws a nice collection of pictures with different experts and educators on how technology has enabled us to interact, innovate and share in whole new ways. They come to the conclusion that the dynamic shift in mindset is creating profound change throughout our society. The video “The Future of Learning” identifies that change as a “potential to redefine how we learn and educate”. It will take you away from a world of traditional methods of learning based on memorization and repetition to more holistic approaches that focus on individual students’ needs and self expression.